Seymours Sweet-Orange

A most desirable second-early or mid-season variety growing vigorously from six to seven feet in height and producing an average of two good ears to a stalk. The ears are ready for use five days to a week later than those of the Golden Bantam and are from six to seven inches in length with twelve to fourteen rows of deep rather slender grains of a light canary-yellow. It is fully equal in surpassingly delicious flavor to our famous Golden Bantam. Of strong growth the larger ears are well filled and the grains are exceptionally sweet and full of milk. The grains remain soft and tender for a longer period than those of any other second-early sweet corn. Reports from cool Northern localities praise the hardiness of growth and early season of maturity while those from the South speak of the protection afforded from worms and smut by the strong heavy husk. Pkt. (2 oz) 15c pt. 20c pt. 30c by mail postpaid. qt.

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White-Cob Cory

This is equally as early as the Red-Cob Cory but is rather less hardy. The grains retain their pearly whiteness when cooked. Pkt. 10c pt. 20c postpaid. qt. 25c 4 qts. 75c peck 1.25.

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Cory

This popular extra early variety succeeds well where the summer is short cool and moist. Ears six inches in length with eight rows of quite broad grains. The cob is red. Pkt. 10c pt. 20c postpaid. qt. 25c 4 qt. 75c peck 1.25.

A very early sort with good sized ears and large kernels an old favorite. Pkt. 15c lb. 25c 2 lb. 40c 12 lb. 2.25.

This popular extra early variety originated in Rhode Island and has for years headed the list of quick-maturing sorts. It is fit for use in two months after planting. It is very dwarf and may be closely planted. Produces two ears to the stalk. Is often grown in Autumn as a second crop. Ears about six inches in length with eight rows of broad grains very sweet and well flavored. A ready seller and always commands good prices.

One of the largest and best extra early varieties. The stalks are about 4 feet high each generally bearing two large fine-shaped ears which become fit for use as early as those of any variety in cultivation. They are 12 rowed very symmetrical and handsome seldom with any opening between the rows at the base.

The principle use of Witloof is as a winter salad and it is most delicious served with French dressing and eaten like Cos lettuce. The seed should be sown in the open ground not later than June in drills twelve to eighteen inches apart thinning out the plants so that they will stand not closer than three inches. The plant forms long parsnip-shaped roots and these should be lifted in the fall cutting off the leaves and then store in soil in a cool place until wanted to forcing. The roots should be planted in a trench sixteen to eighteen inches deep and placed upright about one and a half to two inches apart which will allow the neck of the root to come within nine inches of the level of the trench. The trench should be filled with a light soil and if a quicker growth is desired this can be accomplished bu a mulch of fresh manure about two feet deep. It requires about one month to force the roots and the heads are cut off with a small portion of the neck of the root attached. Pkt. 5c oz. 30c lb. 85c lb. 3.00 postpaid.

This is equally as early as the Red-Cob Cory but is rather less hardy. The grains retain their pearly whiteness when cooked. Pkt. 10c pt. 20c postpaid. qt. 25c 4 qts. 75c peck 1.25.

The largest of the extra early sorts so early that two crops can readily be sown on the same ground in a single season. Ears eight-rowed with red cob and very light pink grains which are broad and sweet. Pkt. 8C lb. 22C lb. 40c.

This is grown for its green shoots which are boiled in salt water and served hot or in cold salad. They are very tender and delicious with the flavor of Asparagus. New sprouts appear all season. Pkt. 10c oz. 25c oz. 40c lb. 1.35 lb. 4.25 prepaid.

The famous winter salad. A delicious winter vegetable which is really a variety of chicory but is sometimes called French Endive. Forms leaves like Cos lettuce and can be eaten raw as salad or boiled. Being available in Winter will make a profitable crop. It can be easily grown by anyone. The seed should be sown in the open ground not later than June in drills twelve to eighteen inches apart thinning out the plants so that they will stand not closer than three inches. The plant forms long parsnip-shaped roots and these should be lifted in the Fall cutting off the leaves and then stored in soil in a cool place until wanted for forcing. The roots should be planted in a trench 16 to 18 inches deep and placed upright about 1 to 2 inches apart. It requires about one month to force the roots and the heads are cut off with a small portion of the root attached. Pkt. 5C oz. 25C 2 oz. 45C lb. 75c.

Having been told by a friend who marketed largely in Fall River and Providence that the market men in his vicinity had found an earlier sweet corn of market size than the Early Marblehead I took a journey to his vicinity to call around among his neighbors and learn directly from their lips what they had to say about it. I saw several of them and from others who were not at home when I called I received statements after I returned. As they are men of high standing two of them members of the Legislature and none of them knew of the direct object of my inquiry I consider what they stated as testimony of the first class. It appears that a Mr. Cory for years had a monopoly of the early market in early sweet corn that in the course of time he gave a little to two or three of his friends and it became known as the Cory Corn. Mr. Chas .J. Talman said that he knew that Mr. Cory and the few friends he let have his corn always carried the first sweet corn into the markets of Newport Fall River and Providence. Mr. Charles N. Dyer said that he had raised the Early Marblehead side by side with the Cory and found that the Cory was a few days earlier it made a larger and more presentable ear for marketing the husk covering the tip of the ear better than was the case with the Marblehead. Mr. Lorenzo Talman told me that aiming to get the very earliest sweet corn he raised 4 rows of Marblehead Early side by side with the Cory and found the latter the earlier by three or four days but said he these four days made the difference with me between 35 or 50 and 20 cents per dozen. Hon. William L. Lisson stated that the Cory corn was the earliest kind he has ever known while the ears were the largest of any early sort. Mr. M. B. Sylvia said The ears of my Cory Corn are larger than Marblehead Early or Minnesota and earlier than either of them. Hon. John F. Chace said I planted some Early Marblehead and after it came up a friend gave me a little of the Cory Corn I planted this beside the Marblehead and picked green corn from it before I could from the Marblehead. The Cory has the largest ear. Mr. Anthony said I find it a decided improvement on the Marblehead in earliness size of kernels and general presentableness of the ear. From these statements of the little cluster of marketmen who have actually raised it it appears evident that any of my customers by planting the Cory Corn can have a complete monopoly of the market for early corn in his vicinity with all the pecuniary advantages that that would give him. In general appearance it closely resembles the Marblehead and I have no doubt this seed originally came from the same parent stock. Having purchased the entire stock of this new corn. I offer it to my customers at the following rates viz. pkt. 15c pt. 35c pt. 60c qt. 1.00 postpaid.

Resembles the ordinary Cory but with white cob. Ear 5c qt. 30c pkt. 1.00 pkt. 1.75 bus. 6.50.

A good substitute for coffee. Per pkt 5c. oz. 25c.

This is certainly the most valuable Corn ever set out. It is one or two weeks earlier than any other sort the ears being large and dine and not small and inferior like other early sorts. The quality is also the best being very sweet tender and delicious Its productiveness is truly marvelous as nearly every stalk produces three full sized perfect ears. It is a remarkable variety and eclipses all other early sorts. Pkt 10c pt 30c qt 50c.

A very early variety with good-sized ears. Ear 5c qt. 30c pkt. 1.00 pkt. 1.75 bus. 6.00.

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Howling-Mob

Originated with C.D. Keller of Toledo Ohio and its peculiar but apt name refers to the vociferous demand for the ears when Mr. Keller takes them to market. In developing this corn the originator aimed to secure a large ear early in the season and at the same time possessing the sweet flavor of the later varieties. The stalks are of strong vigorous growth four and one-half to five feet in height have abundant foliage and generally produce two fine ears to a stalk. The ears measure seven to nine inches in length with twelve or fourteen rows of good sized pearly-white grains. The ears are covered with a heavy husk which extends well out from the tip and affords good protection from the green worms which are so often destructive of early Sweet corn. Burpees Early Howling-Mob is ready for use only three to five days later than the extra early Cory when both are planted at the same time but the ears are so much larger in size while the grains are so much whiter and sweeter that it should really be compared with the second-early Crosbys Twelve-Rowed and other varieties of a later season. The seed we offer has all been grown by the originator and the originators stock can be obtained only from us. Pkt. 10c pt. 20c pt. 30c by mail postpaid. qt. 35c 4 qt. 1.10 peck 2.00

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Early Fordhook

This is one of the largest-eared extra earlies the ears averaging six to seven inches in length. It is two to three days earlier than the Cory of better flavor and has both grains and cob of pure white coloring. The ears are eight-rowed with quite small cob and deep grains. While of much the same habit of growth it is greatly superior to the Cory in sweetness of flavor. Pkt. 10c pt. 25c postpaid. qt. 30c 4 qt. 1.00 peck 1.75.

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Burpees Earliest Catawba

Resembles our famous Golden Bantam in dwarf growth and extreme earliness but differs in coloring and flavor. Grown singly in long rows the plants sucker freely and then frequently bear as many as four and five good ears from a single seed. It produces uniformly handsome ears from six to seven inches long rather slender and just the right size to eat from the cob which is well filled to the tip with eight rows of broad grains. When ready for use the grains are pearly white slightly flushed with rose-pink but in the dry seed the color is the exact counterpart of a fine Catawba grape a dark rich purple shaded with rose. The small cob is white. Some growers pronounce it even more tender and more deliciously sweet than the popular favorite Golden Bantam. Pkt. 10c pt. 20c pt. 30c by mail postpaid. qt. 35c 4 qt. 1.10 peck 2.00

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Red Cob Golden Bantam Corn

A true descendant of the Golden Bantam. It was discovered several years ago by Mr. Briggs of Newton Mass. and on account of its extreme sweetness and tenderness was given the opportunity of proving its worth. The dry seed is of crimson hue but when in the green state if placed side by side with the Golden Bantam could not be told from it except that the ears and kernels average somewhat larger. Aside from its sweetness and tenderness another point in its favor is that the kernels have practically no hulls. The cob is of a decided crimson color and the foliage is streaked with red. Matures at the same time as its parent stock. Pkt. 15c postpaid lb. 30c 12 lb. 3.00

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Golden Orange Sweet Corn

A popular sort among the farmers and market gardeners in southern New Hampshire Maine and eastern Massachusetts. Can be classed as an extra early sort from 7-8 inches in length slender with small cob kernels large deep set in even rows and filling out the ears to the tip. Pkt. 15c lb. 30c 2 lb. 50c 12 lb. 2.75.

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Brecks Selected Massachusetts Grown Golden Bantam

The most popular variety of yellow sweet corn ever offered also one of the earliest and hardiest. It can be planted safely earlier than other varieties. The plants rarely grow over 3 feet in height and usually bear at least two ears 5 or 6 inches long on each stalk. Many people assert that Golden Bantam is the sweetest of all corns its plump rich cream-yellow kernels are tender milky and delicious. All our Golden Bantam seed is Northern grown making it especially valuable for growth in sections where the summers are cool and short. lb. 30c 2 lb. 50c 12 lb. 2.75.

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Stowells Evergreen Sweet Corn

The standard main crop variety for market and for the home garden. Ears large kernels deep sugary and tender remaining in green stage for an unusually long time. We are placing on the market this year the improved strain known as Platts which is earlier than the common stock (which has been for so long the standard late sort) Stowells Evergreen and the yield most extraordinary running as high as 175 bushels per acre the majority of the stalks having two ears. Our grower reports that this years stock was ready for the market 10 days in advance of the original Stowells Evergreen. It is not uncommon for the ears to have from 18 to 20 rows. Pkt. 15c lb. 30c 2 lb. 50c 12 lb. 2.75.

This is the leading standard variety for home use market and canning. My stock is most carefully selected and can be depended upon to produce fine large ears of superior quality. The stalks are of strong growth each producing two large ears. The grains while of good size are long and slender the cob being small. The grains are of rich sugary flavor and retain their fine quality until quite advanced. My stock is entirely free from glaze or flintiness the dried grains are much shriveled. Price-(10c per pkt.) (30c per lb.) (25c per lb. In 10-lb. Lots) prepaid 15c per lb. Not prepaid.

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