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axhandle November 11th, 2010 07:14 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ajla (Post 653425)
Treacle is like golden syrup, you can afford that! :)

Going to visit the groceries , if they don't have it, there is a specialty shop across town--Thanks--

I sometimes put Fig Preserves on mine--Yum--;):)

axhandle November 11th, 2010 09:24 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
1 Attachment(s)
Veterans Day ,and I'd like to shake this fellows hand, I believe he is still alive, story goes (Bastogne), we were getting our "Greens" cleaned at the onset of the "Bulge" Offensive.

A Sherman Tank pulled up and asked this guy who was digging in,, "where are the front lines!?", with a Southern Drawl came the retort, " Just pull that thing in behind me this as far as the B------- are going"

American Fighting Spirit--absolutely, You Bet!

redneckplanter November 11th, 2010 11:19 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
smiles.
all looks well in da corner?

axhandle November 11th, 2010 11:54 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by redneckplanter (Post 653648)
smiles.
all looks well in da corner?

Well, went to visit some present Veterans,God Knows,the wind and sand, PTSD, reaks Havoc on them , as bad as the heat and humidity of S.E.A --only more fungus on feet, and in some circumstance --everywhere--including--"Above the Ankles"--Hang in --"The World Turns"----Ax.

Ajla November 13th, 2010 08:55 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
I'm trying out a Szekely Sauerkraut Goulash tonight!

axhandle November 13th, 2010 09:16 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ajla (Post 654664)
I'm trying out a Szekely Sauerkraut Goulash tonight!

Got to look that one up--sauerkraut goulash--
Work friend of mine kept praising Sauerkraut Pie once, never knew if he was kidding or not--:)
Weather still nice here , mid '60's all next week, some showers.

redneckplanter November 13th, 2010 09:47 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
sounds good sir pork of posts.......smiles

axhandle November 13th, 2010 03:45 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by redneckplanter (Post 654697)
sounds good sir pork of posts.......smiles

And how are you, Sir Loin?--chuckle.

axhandle November 15th, 2010 07:48 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Got up at 0445 this morning, in anticipation of getting outside, cold rain but I'm not complaining, the burn ban is off, and I can get some cleaning/burning done in the next several days.

P.S. Door neighbor still has turnip greens, and the frost fell on them last week, talk about the best greens!!---First Frost.

Ajla November 15th, 2010 08:28 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 655345)
Got up at 0445 this morning, in anticipation of getting outside, cold rain but I'm not complaining, the burn ban is off, and I can get some cleaning/burning done in the next several days.

P.S. Door neighbor still has turnip greens, and the frost fell on them last week, talk about the best greens!!---First Frost.

My turnip greens are still going strong too! Or maybe they are the 'shogun' ones, Japanese root+green?

Garlicluvr November 15th, 2010 09:04 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Good Morning Ax: or Guten Morgen herr Ax:

Had a beautiful fall weekend here, took it easy for the most part. Had to sharpen mower blades and change the wife's oil but otherwise a pretty lazy weekend. Did a little target shooting with the .22 and pellet guns. Started shaping a longbow prototype out of some straight grained white oak. Will see how it goes.



Jeff:)

axhandle November 15th, 2010 09:28 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Garlicluvr (Post 655403)
Good Morning Ax: or Guten Morgen herr Ax:

Had a beautiful fall weekend here, took it easy for the most part. Had to sharpen mower blades and change the wife's oil but otherwise a pretty lazy weekend. Did a little target shooting with the .22 and pellet guns. Started shaping a longbow prototype out of some straight grained white oak. Will see how it goes.



Jeff:)

Guten Morgen,Est ist eine ausgeseichnet Tag, es ist Regnen--

It's going to be a real killer Fall this year, the foilage is just now turning here and this A.M. it is already beautiful--probably one of the best yet.

Had G'Daughter over , the weekend, she's 6 and crafty in more than one respect--'Missus passed me a local Newspaper clipping across the table this morning that G'daughter had cut out for me. A Wid Boar pic one of the locals had taken, she never ceases to amaze me.

Love .22's and have several pellet guns.

Lick our chops--1950's .22 prices, S/L/LR-- 29cents, 39 cents, 49 cents--BB's nickle a pack--do I miss it.

Keep me posted on the bow, very interested----Ax.

axhandle November 15th, 2010 09:31 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 655413)
Guten Morgen,Est ist eine ausgeseichnet Tag, es ist Regnen--

It's going to be a real killer Fall this year, the foilage is just now turning here and this A.M. it is already beautiful--probably one of the best yet.

Had G'Daughter over , the weekend, she's 6 and crafty in more than one respect--'Missus passed me a local Newspaper clipping across the table this morning that G'daughter had cut out for me. A Wid Boar pic one of the locals had taken, she never ceases to amaze me.

Love .22's and have several pellet guns.

Lick our chops--1950's .22 prices, S/L/LR-- 29cents, 39 cents, 49 cents--BB's nickle a pack--do I miss it.

Keep me posted on the bow, very interested----Ax.


P.S. Be glad to send you some Osage Orange to decorate that up---use bone for the tips--;)

axhandle November 15th, 2010 09:39 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ajla (Post 655371)
My turnip greens are still going strong too! Or maybe they are the 'shogun' ones, Japanese root+green?

None better, Turnips and Greens, neighbors are Var. "Purple Tops" abput 3-6inches on the roots.

I love that mild green pepper sauce made with nothing but peppers, salt and vinegar in it, it makes the greens even mor sublime, and aids the digestion--

Have a painting for you later--"The Flying Dutchman"--

Garlicluvr November 15th, 2010 10:05 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 655414)
P.S. Be glad to send you some Osage Orange to decorate that up---use bone for the tips--;)

Ax: When you say bone for the tips, do you mean just the very tip or the whole string notch area. I have quite a bit of antler around would need a real good adhesive to handle that kind of strain from stringing and shooting the bow.

Jeff:)


I wonder if it would be better to steam bend the limbs some or just shape, taper them with bandsaw then drawknife and spoke shaves.

axhandle November 15th, 2010 10:10 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
1 Attachment(s)
Aj,"The Flying Dutchman"--c.1887, Albert Pinckham Ryder--

Honus Wagner ,American Baseball, was also known by the name of the same--

axhandle November 15th, 2010 10:20 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Garlicluvr (Post 655443)
Ax: When you say bone for the tips, do you mean just the very tip or the whole string notch area. I have quite a bit of antler around would need a real good adhesive to handle that kind of strain from stringing and shooting the bow.

Jeff:)


I wonder if it would be better to steam bend the limbs some or just shape, taper them with bandsaw then drawknife and spoke shaves.

The string notch,(Antler is best) don't steam--, drawknife,shave( careful on spoke shaves) and scratch chin(think), often--Looking up bowstring length for you, also figure in you height got to figure that in , in the billet--

Go over to the guys that do aircraft maintenance, for the glue--Brother used it, it holds chopper blades together--not commercially available;)

Ajla November 16th, 2010 09:25 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 655447)
Aj,"The Flying Dutchman"--c.1887, Albert Pinckham Ryder--

Honus Wagner ,American Baseball, was also known by the name of the same--

What a nice pic! This has always been one of my favourite stories!

axhandle November 16th, 2010 09:43 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ajla (Post 656107)
What a nice pic! This has always been one of my favourite stories!

Mine too, along with "Wynken, Blynken and Nod"--
"Die ,Katze ist, auf de Kroon"--

You would like it here today,the Foilage is gorgeous, Mother Nature put a, a Fine Wash,of rain, almost Aniline Brilliance in the gift.
A walk in the Forest, maybe seeking treasure, renewing friendship with the creatures,---"A loaf of Bread, a Cup of hot Tea, and --to simple treasures of life"

axhandle November 16th, 2010 11:27 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
For the SADS prone-- a couple of movies--

"Where Eagles Dare"-- I love the Iso-Franchetti in the beginning, and the wind howling around the castle.

"Lonesome Dove"---"C'pn Call: "Ain't no use in anybody being rude"

Ajla November 17th, 2010 09:24 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
http://www.wfp.org/quiz

Chiara is sailing the Kroon again, she loves it!
Can Wink, Blink and Nod come too?

axhandle November 17th, 2010 10:59 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ajla (Post 656889)
http://www.wfp.org/quiz

Chiara is sailing the Kroon again, she loves it!
Can Wink, Blink and Nod come too?

Absolutely, You Bet !!--I still see that bench, we could share-;)--some Chess---,some Cheese, a bite of bread, --Wink---Ax.

Garlicluvr November 17th, 2010 07:27 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Ax: Update on oak longbow, got it shaped pretty well, but ran into a snag, what looked like fairly straight grain actually had a few wild grain spots or spots where the grain ran out.

So to make a long story short got it strung with some poly or dacron twine shot a few times wasn't half bad then it broke at the weak spot where the grain ran out.

I did learn quite a bit though in the process and already have a plan for the next try. I am going to try using locust which I have a few nice saplings 3" to 4" in diameter out in the woods. Am going to rive out a section with the froe that has the springier more flexible sapwood on the outside and heartwood on the inside. This is how the english yew ones were made. Also read that the Welsh and English sometimes used Elm and Ash also with good results. If locust doesn't work I might try the Elm or Ash.

Riving instead of sawing the blank should help considerably as riven pieces are much stronger and more flexible than a sawn piece of equal diameter and riving ensures all fibers follow the grain and run the full length of the piece. I once read that in the days of all wooden ladders fire departments that needed very tall wooden ladders actually specified that all rungs be riven and not sawn.

I will keep you posted may get out in the woods and cut a small locust for bow blanks this weekend.


Jeff:)

Ajla November 18th, 2010 06:25 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 657016)
Absolutely, You Bet !!--I still see that bench, we could share-;)--some Chess---,some Cheese, a bite of bread, --Wink---Ax.

I think a sip of wine would go better with that scenario, so we can leave the milkmaid at home? ;)

axhandle November 18th, 2010 06:58 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Garlicluvr (Post 657309)
Ax: Update on oak longbow, got it shaped pretty well, but ran into a snag, what looked like fairly straight grain actually had a few wild grain spots or spots where the grain ran out.

So to make a long story short got it strung with some poly or dacron twine shot a few times wasn't half bad then it broke at the weak spot where the grain ran out.

I did learn quite a bit though in the process and already have a plan for the next try. I am going to try using locust which I have a few nice saplings 3" to 4" in diameter out in the woods. Am going to rive out a section with the froe that has the springier more flexible sapwood on the outside and heartwood on the inside. This is how the english yew ones were made. Also read that the Welsh and English sometimes used Elm and Ash also with good results. If locust doesn't work I might try the Elm or Ash.

Riving instead of sawing the blank should help considerably as riven pieces are much stronger and more flexible than a sawn piece of equal diameter and riving ensures all fibers follow the grain and run the full length of the piece. I once read that in the days of all wooden ladders fire departments that needed very tall wooden ladders actually specified that all rungs be riven and not sawn.

I will keep you posted may get out in the woods and cut a small locust for bow blanks this weekend.


Jeff:)

Very tricky on the grain thing, has to be all straight.
Measure nock groove distance on belly of bow, for Dacron subtract 4 inches --string length.
Get a chance look up The Mary Rose, phenomenal what they salvaged from it--the longbows arrows , strings etc all there among thousands of other relics.

Cherokee Bows, are among the simplest Hickory is usually used, Longbows are my favorite.--:)

axhandle November 18th, 2010 06:59 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ajla (Post 657491)
I think a sip of wine would go better with that scenario, so we can leave the milkmaid at home? ;)

Slivovitz ,O.K.--?:)

Ajla November 18th, 2010 07:10 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 657509)
Slivovitz ,O.K.--?:)

Mmmmmm, jenever? ;)

Garlicluvr November 18th, 2010 07:28 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 657507)
Very tricky on the grain thing, has to be all straight.
Measure nock groove distance on belly of bow, for Dacron subtract 4 inches --string length.
Get a chance look up The Mary Rose, phenomenal what they salvaged from it--the longbows arrows , strings etc all there among thousands of other relics.

Cherokee Bows, are among the simplest Hickory is usually used, Longbows are my favorite.--:)

Ax: I actually found some info on the Mary Rose in my longbow research, fascinating. I noticed the most common arrow wood was poplar. Something I have plenty of around here.

I sometimes forget that at the time these were made 1250's up until mid to late 1400's they would have surely used riven wood blanks as sawmills weren't common. Also given the fact that most were fashioned by the user, they would have selected a sapling or smallish tree probably under 5" diameter for the stock.

Luckily my dabbling in histroical restoration work gave me some hands on experience with the froe, hewing hatchett, drawknife and shaving horse. I know and have used all of the basic techniques just a little rusty.

I might also try one of the plains Indian bows, the short calvary bows meant to be shot from horseback. The ones Ghengis Khan and the Mongol horsemen used are also fascinating one of the earlier recurve designs.

I have always enjoyed researching this type of stuff, early weapons and woodworking/construction techniques. And metalworking.


Jeff:)

axhandle November 18th, 2010 08:09 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ajla (Post 657513)
Mmmmmm, jenever? ;)

Sounds good to me--:)

axhandle November 18th, 2010 08:13 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Garlicluvr (Post 657521)
Ax: I actually found some info on the Mary Rose in my longbow research, fascinating. I noticed the most common arrow wood was poplar. Something I have plenty of around here.

I sometimes forget that at the time these were made 1250's up until mid to late 1400's they would have surely used riven wood blanks as sawmills weren't common. Also given the fact that most were fashioned by the user, they would have selected a sapling or smallish tree probably under 5" diameter for the stock.

Luckily my dabbling in histroical restoration work gave me some hands on experience with the froe, hewing hatchett, drawknife and shaving horse. I know and have used all of the basic techniques just a little rusty.

I might also try one of the plains Indian bows, the short calvary bows meant to be shot from horseback. The ones Ghengis Khan and the Mongol horsemen used are also fascinating one of the earlier recurve designs.

I have always enjoyed researching this type of stuff, early weapons and woodworking/construction techniques. And metalworking.


Jeff:)

Mongols were superb, horn recurve--Egyptians used fish glue in theirs, but it took two years to cure--I enjoy the same--If you run across how the blacksmith made the English broadhead, let me know been lookinfo how they forged and formed.

Garlicluvr November 18th, 2010 12:06 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 657545)
Mongols were superb, horn recurve--Egyptians used fish glue in theirs, but it took two years to cure--I enjoy the same--If you run across how the blacksmith made the English broadhead, let me know been lookinfo how they forged and formed.

Ax if I come across the info I will pass it on to you. I haven't even seen many pictures of the English broadheads.

Could probably figure out how to forge one. Blacksmithing techniques haven't changed much over the years. Some modern tools have been added but forge anvil and hammer remain unchanged.

We now have such time and labor saving devices as power hammers (wish i had one, sledge and heavy anvil for me still), electric forge blowers (still love a nice big bellows though), propane forges and heat treating furnaces (I still prefer coal for the forge or charcoal as a second choice).

We also have electric drill presses, grinders etc. All save a little labor and maybe time but all can still be done just as well with the hand or people powered tools. I have a hand crank buffalo forge blower for my forge, works great though electric is sometimes nice and as i said before i love a nice bellows just something nostalgic and primal about it.



Jeff :)

axhandle November 19th, 2010 05:19 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
SIL did quite a bit of Blacksmithing during his early years, we both want a real "Beehive" type furnace, for smelting.
I've made some Bodkin points in the past, and have a plan for a small forge, made out of a truck brakedrum---till I get something permanent.
The local landfill here has tons of firebrick, they cut it out of the refuse and recycle--Got a pic for you a bit later--may have to resize it--something you will recognize--;)

axhandle November 19th, 2010 06:42 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 658779)
SIL did quite a bit of Blacksmithing during his early years, we both want a real "Beehive" type furnace, for smelting.
I've made some Bodkin points in the past, and have a plan for a small forge, made out of a truck brakedrum---till I get something permanent.
The local landfill here has tons of firebrick, they cut it out of the refuse and recycle--Got a pic for you a bit later--may have to resize it--something you will recognize--;)

Jeff,
I have to do re-sizing on p-bucket, and they have thrown more popups in and general flummery,(Grrrr), will wait till matters there have settled down and post the pic for you, it's a B&W.

Garlicluvr November 19th, 2010 07:00 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 658779)
SIL did quite a bit of Blacksmithing during his early years, we both want a real "Beehive" type furnace, for smelting.
I've made some Bodkin points in the past, and have a plan for a small forge, made out of a truck brakedrum---till I get something permanent.
The local landfill here has tons of firebrick, they cut it out of the refuse and recycle--Got a pic for you a bit later--may have to resize it--something you will recognize--;)

My first forge was a brake drum forge with some black iron pipe for the tuyere and a simple metal grate for the air outlet. Lucked out and came across the hand crank blower hooked it up to the pipe with flexible metal duct and hose clamps a little coal and i was in business.

Bought my anvil from a local guy that does decorative iron railing etc. and had an extra a 100 lb. swedish anvil got it for $100 or $150 at the time. I buy used tongs when I find them at auctions flea markets etc. Same with hardy tools and I made my own hot cut hardy from a piece of truck axle. Also made a holdfast, various chisels punches etc. from coil springs and other automotive and farm implement parts.

I bought a nice cast iron fire pot with the ash gate clinker breaker etc from centaur forge and a hood. Just need to find time to build the rest of my new forge. Learned a few things from making and using the first one will implement a few improvements on this one. I want a bigger metal and/or masonry table around the fire pot to get larger work into the forge. I once saw an old cast iron shower pan that would have been perfect just add legs. Masonry looks nicer but metal is just as functional and you can put firebrick and sand on top.

I also would like to find a good post vice and a cone mandrel.

Jeff

Garlicluvr November 19th, 2010 07:01 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 658841)
Jeff,
I have to do re-sizing on p-bucket, and they have thrown more popups in and general flummery,(Grrrr), will wait till matters there have settled down and post the pic for you, it's a B&W.

Glad i dont have to mess with photobucket.

Jeff:)

axhandle November 19th, 2010 07:08 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Garlicluvr (Post 658857)
My first forge was a brake drum forge with some black iron pipe for the tuyere and a simple metal grate for the air outlet. Lucked out and came across the hand crank blower hooked it up to the pipe with flexible metal duct and hose clamps a little coal and i was in business.

Bought my anvil from a local guy that does decorative iron railing etc. and had an extra a 100 lb. swedish anvil got it for $100 or $150 at the time. I buy used tongs when I find them at auctions flea markets etc. Same with hardy tools and I made my own hot cut hardy from a piece of truck axle. Also made a holdfast, various chisels punches etc. from coil springs and other automotive and farm implement parts.

I bought a nice cast iron fire pot with the ash gate clinker breaker etc from centaur forge and a hood. Just need to find time to build the rest of my new forge. Learned a few things from making and using the first one will implement a few improvements on this one. I want a bigger metal and/or masonry table around the fire pot to get larger work into the forge. I once saw an old cast iron shower pan that would have been perfect just add legs. Masonry looks nicer but metal is just as functional and you can put firebrick and sand on top.

I also would like to find a good post vice and a cone mandrel.

Jeff

The anvil was probably Sandvik--my favorite steel--a yard sale two yrs ago had a 300 lb Sandvik anvil--still kick myself but he had it at standard, $1.00/lb, he had the goods and I was short of cash.

My door neighbor(79 yrs old) has his Dad's post vise, about 7 yrs ago he said--" I might give it to you"--think I might better go ask , before he forgets?--chuckle.

Yea I bout had it with p-bucket--my old software got smashed in a crash about 7-8 months ago.

Ax.

Garlicluvr November 19th, 2010 07:19 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Have you ever priced new anvils Ax. Even without shipping almost had a coronary going rate for farriers or nice german Pendinghaus blacksmiths anvils is from $7-$8 a pound and shipping isn't included. Needless to say I wont be buying a new one soon unless i hit the lottery.

I would like a heavy anvil 200 to 300 lb for sledge work. I always keep my eyes open at yard sales auctions etc.

Tomorrow if all goes as planned I will find a small locust for some longbow blanks. Let the oldest son make one also.

I also need to find a supplier for good pea sized bituminous coal. Used to be a place up north of baltimore that carried it but not sure if they are still there.

Jeff:)

axhandle November 19th, 2010 07:29 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Heart attack is right on the anvils--whowwww
Will keep my eye out, I'm retired and on my own time so got plenty of time to look around.

Also, the bituminous/ pea sized have some resources and will check for you.Most 'Bama coal is anthracite, but heard about 6mo ago the steam plant down the road was haulin in Wyoming coal, bitum I think--G'Dad said the coal in Old Country was brownish red--no wonder Skoda Steel is so good--;)

The big trucks used to run close to here, and on any given day I could go down and pick a trunkful of coke off the roads--not anymore--

Garlicluvr November 19th, 2010 07:40 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 658887)
Heart attack is right on the anvils--whowwww
Will keep my eye out, I'm retired and on my own time so got plenty of time to look around.

Also, the bituminous/ pea sized have some resources and will check for you.Most 'Bama coal is anthracite, but heard about 6mo ago the steam plant down the road was haulin in Wyoming coal, bitum I think--G'Dad said the coal in Old Country was brownish red--no wonder Skoda Steel is so good--;)

The big trucks used to run close to here, and on any given day I could go down and pick a trunkful of coke off the roads--not anymore--

I found out real quick that anthracite is no good for the forge, lots of ash, not as much heat, and the second you stop blowing air through it starts cooling off forget to crank the blower for long and your fire goes out. Coke is great you get to skip the time it takes to burn the sulfur and other impurities off of the bituminous coal and go straight to a nice very hot very clean fire.

Bituminous turns into coke gets sticky and binds together and is easy to shape into a nice volcano or any shape you need for the fire. I used to place a 1 pound coffee can over the grate pack coal that had been soaked in a five gallon bucket of water around the can, pull can out put one crumbled piece of paper and some wood shavings in the middle light crank blower and Wala fire. Real easy.

Train goes by about a half mile from my house four times a day hauling coal to the power plant. Dont know what kind but may go check the tracks.

Inlaws are in Western Pennsylvania so I could probably find some up there too.


Jeff:)

axhandle November 20th, 2010 01:16 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Jeff,
Need your input--spring tempering technique.

I have an old .22 , common hardware variety of the '30's trigger return spring is missing--I can fabricate but tempering has always been a problem for me.

In recriprocation:

Color case hardening:
Sprinkle the piece with ground bone, wrap in leather and bind with copper wire, put in an empty can-crush and throw in fire, going to do this in the fireplace this winter--only did this once and rushed it--which is the reason it didn't turn out so great.
I really like the play of colors, blues, reds greens---

Garlicluvr November 20th, 2010 03:28 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 659241)
Jeff,
Need your input--spring tempering technique.

I have an old .22 , common hardware variety of the '30's trigger return spring is missing--I can fabricate but tempering has always been a problem for me.

In recriprocation:

Color case hardening:
Sprinkle the piece with ground bone, wrap in leather and bind with copper wire, put in an empty can-crush and throw in fire, going to do this in the fireplace this winter--only did this once and rushed it--which is the reason it didn't turn out so great.
I really like the play of colors, blues, reds greens---

Ax: tempering small springs is tricky. Procedure goes as follows.

1.) select a good high carbon steel to make the spring form. Form spring by forging, grinding, filing etc.

2.) Bring spring to a bright cherry red color using forge or propane torch. When it reaches cherry red quench quickly in either oil or rendered fat (quenching fluid must be oil or rendered fat for small springs water or brine will cool them too fast, plain old mineral oil works well. Also be sure to completely submerge part in the oil and hold still.) After quenching spring will be hardened.

3.) Use sand paper wire brush etc. to polish the surface of the spring so that you will be able to see the temper colors. Very carefully and gradually heat spring over either a propane torch flame or a gas stove burner (start out far away so as not to heat too fast) Watch carefully for the temper or oxidation colors to appear, the first should be a light straw yellow followed by straw, bronze, peacock (bright purple), purple, blue, then light blue. You want to stop the heating and quench in oil again when the spring turn a peacock or (bright purple) color.

If you go to far all is not lost simply start over at step 2 harden again then temper again.


Hope this helps Jeff:)

A good basic blacksmithing and tool making book is "The Complete Modern Blacksmith" by Alexander G. Weygers

axhandle November 20th, 2010 03:39 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Garlicluvr (Post 659288)
Ax: tempering small springs is tricky. Procedure goes as follows.

1.) select a good high carbon steel to make the spring form. Form spring by forging, grinding, filing etc.

2.) Bring spring to a bright cherry red color using forge or propane torch. When it reaches cherry red quench quickly in either oil or rendered fat (quenching fluid must be oil or rendered fat for small springs water or brine will cool them too fast, plain old mineral oil works well. Also be sure to completely submerge part in the oil and hold still.) After quenching spring will be hardened.

3.) Use sand paper wire brush etc. to polish the surface of the spring so that you will be able to see the temper colors. Very carefully and gradually heat spring over either a propane torch flame or a gas stove burner (start out far away so as not to heat too fast) Watch carefully for the temper or oxidation colors to appear, the first should be a light straw yellow followed by straw, bronze, peacock (bright purple), purple, blue, then light blue. You want to stop the heating and quench in oil again when the spring turn a peacock or (bright purple) color.

If you go to far all is not lost simply start over at step 2 harden again then temper again.


Hope this helps Jeff:)

A good basic blacksmithing and tool making book is "The Complete Modern Blacksmith" by Alexander G. Weygers

Precisely what I needed--! I'll have the old Pig Rifle going before the month is out--Ax.---and thanks for the book lead--

axhandle November 21st, 2010 05:58 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Jeff, if you haven't already look up battle of Agincourt---re: Longbow's, it is mind boggleing.

Garlicluvr November 22nd, 2010 07:03 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 659981)
Jeff, if you haven't already look up battle of Agincourt---re: Longbow's, it is mind boggleing.

I haven't Ax but now I will have to thanks.

A side note on the quenching in oil, always make sure to quickly plunge the part down into the oil and keep it completely submerged otherwise you might get a flame up or ignite the oil. I used to have a metal 30 gallon drum with metal lid that I put a handle on for my oil quenching, I just used old motor oil as it was readily available and free I couldn't afford to buy a drum of quenching oil which was a food grade mineral oil cost a couple hundred dollars for the drum at the time. If I got a flare up I just put the metal lid on and smothered it. Worked well and none ever got away from me.

Longbow progress: tried riving some locust but it was too knotty, found a maple that I was able to get one decent piece out of and maybe another for a short or kids bow. I also glued up a lamination out of cherry to try a laminated version. Don't have any fiberglass right now so mine will be all wood. So two in progress will see how they come out a bit early to tell now.

Jeff:)

Jeff

axhandle November 22nd, 2010 07:57 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
I don't know if it's fact or speculation but it sounds plausible to me, the expression "Giving Them the Bird" (amidst another well known phrase)grew out of combat archery, the feathers on the arrows-

Chuckle, I lost a lot of finger hair due to Flare Ups.
On the locust re knots--I've seen lots of pics of Yew bows , they were knotty as heck, as a kid we made bows out of common hedge, but of course , a toy.

The cherry laminate am interested in the progress of same, I can send you some prime cherry, as long as you don't want anything over 6 ft long:), also I'll post some info for you on a Cherokee bow for the little one--very simple to make and perfect for younger age groups.

P.S. Flemish Strings are the epitome--'An Feathers of 'Tha Grey Goose"

axhandle November 22nd, 2010 08:07 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 660246)
I don't know if it's fact or speculation but it sounds plausible to me, the expression "Giving Them the Bird" (amidst another well known phrase)grew out of combat archery, the feathers on the arrows-

Chuckle, I lost a lot of finger hair due to Flare Ups.
On the locust re knots--I've seen lots of pics of Yew bows , they were knotty as heck, as a kid we made bows out of common hedge, but of course , a toy.

The cherry laminate am interested in the progress of same, I can send you some prime cherry, as long as you don't want anything over 6 ft long:), also I'll post some info for you on a Cherokee bow for the little one--very simple to make and perfect for younger age groups.

P.S. Flemish Strings are the epitome--'An Feathers of 'Tha Grey Goose"

P.S.--Forgot---arrows--poplar was grown to a certain convenient height, over 28 inches, then harvested:

Grows fast,light and strong( had to withstand the force of a 120 # pull and less bow.---perfect.
Most modern day Port Orford cedar.

Mr. Hill's arrows were the Distilled Essence of Medieval Archery, even down to English Broadheads for hunting--he chuckled at all the razor inserts and similar flummery.I cant post his name for recurve bows--save the last----'------ "Flippers"

Garlicluvr November 22nd, 2010 08:23 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 660246)
I don't know if it's fact or speculation but it sounds plausible to me, the expression "Giving Them the Bird" (amidst another well known phrase)grew out of combat archery, the feathers on the arrows-

Chuckle, I lost a lot of finger hair due to Flare Ups.
On the locust re knots--I've seen lots of pics of Yew bows , they were knotty as heck, as a kid we made bows out of common hedge, but of course , a toy.

The cherry laminate am interested in the progress of same, I can send you some prime cherry, as long as you don't want anything over 6 ft long:), also I'll post some info for you on a Cherokee bow for the little one--very simple to make and perfect for younger age groups.

P.S. Flemish Strings are the epitome--'An Feathers of 'Tha Grey Goose"

Ax: thanks for the offer on the cherry but I still have several nice cherry boards and several hard maple ones as well. I also have a good local source for all an Amish sawmill get most all of my hardwoods there.

May try the locust despite the knots, it does seem remarkably flexible.

I looked at the website for Howard Hill archery and at their bows etc. I will buy a couple flemish wound strings probably from them if I get a decent bow going. Will probably buy a dozen good arrows of port orford cedar, saw some nice ones with goose or turkey fletching very traditional.

The reason I am going back to a traditional bow is to get away from all of the gimmickry associated with modern archery and compounds and get back to simple and uncomplicated.

Had a compound once with all of the bells and whistles at the time, four pin sight, string silencers, bow quiver, flipper rest, stabilizer and cable guard. It can be too much, many now use mechanical release too, I always just used a shooting glove or finger tab and two finger release.

I guess I am a little older and wiser now I want simple and reliable, takes more skill on the archers part but don't have to worry about some mechanical gizzmo that you have come to rely on failing at the worst possible time.

P.S. I would be interested in the cherokee bow as both my four year old and the nine year old are already asking me to build them a bow too.



Jeff:)

Garlicluvr November 22nd, 2010 08:31 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Ax: I just read a bit on the battle of Agincourt, very interesting wouldnt mind being let go in that farm field with a metal detector. Of course it may be well picked over by now but you never know.

I remember walking the freshly plowed fields back home in Kansas looking for arrowheads, found a few very nice ones that way. Also found one in my Garden at my previous place here in maryland was planting tomatoes and found a perfect white arrowhead just laying in the dirt.


Jeff:)

axhandle November 22nd, 2010 09:19 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Garlicluvr (Post 660259)
Ax: thanks for the offer on the cherry but I still have several nice cherry boards and several hard maple ones as well. I also have a good local source for all an Amish sawmill get most all of my hardwoods there.

May try the locust despite the knots, it does seem remarkably flexible.

I looked at the website for Howard Hill archery and at their bows etc. I will buy a couple flemish wound strings probably from them if I get a decent bow going. Will probably buy a dozen good arrows of port orford cedar, saw some nice ones with goose or turkey fletching very traditional.

The reason I am going back to a traditional bow is to get away from all of the gimmickry associated with modern archery and compounds and get back to simple and uncomplicated.

Had a compound once with all of the bells and whistles at the time, four pin sight, string silencers, bow quiver, flipper rest, stabilizer and cable guard. It can be too much, many now use mechanical release too, I always just used a shooting glove or finger tab and two finger release.

I guess I am a little older and wiser now I want simple and reliable, takes more skill on the archers part but don't have to worry about some mechanical gizzmo that you have come to rely on failing at the worst possible time.

P.S. I would be interested in the cherokee bow as both my four year old and the nine year old are already asking me to build them a bow too.



Jeff:)

I learned from the Master, Mr.Hill, he was a grand person, and didn't mind, at all, passing on his knowledge.

The Impedimentia (bowsights etc., special this and that), takes away from the true nature of things, I spent almost nil on the concept, ---

Deja Vu--;) One Saturday afternoon after watching "Robin Hood" at the downtown theatre---" we got to go cut some hedge and make a bow"

Xmas present to the Little ones--Mr.Hill on the left--Errol Flynn on the right.

Chuckle--Mr.Hill knows what he is doing, Mr.Flynn is bewildered.

axhandle November 22nd, 2010 01:16 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Follow up----Finished remedial sketch of Cherokee Bow,--submit later---perfect for young ones.----Ax.

axhandle November 22nd, 2010 01:35 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Went down to basement today, to get "A Bite to Eat"--passed by my "Snortin Norton", which I spent many a pleasurable hour in "Making Things Right"---She Whispered to me--"The One Hundred Mile Club", of whitch --'Me 'has a Patch"--of same.-Brood on Harley---as I driffted off to sleep.:)

axhandle November 22nd, 2010 01:44 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
The Magic Words:-----"Yeth, Dear"--and go about ones business--;)

Garlicluvr November 22nd, 2010 02:22 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Ax: I managed to mostly finish the cherry laminate and went to string it and couldnt bend her enough to string on my own. Got help but had a limb failure again it broke.

Back to drawing board I already have enough strips cut for another try, it looked great this time and laminate held up pretty good just not enough taper on the limbs I need to make them quite a bit thinner next time towards the grip, part of the reason this one failed, ends had good flex but I didn't carry the taper far enough towards the grip so it was too stiff and broke when I tried to use the leg brace method of stringing. I also need to order a bow stringer.

Had this one held up I doubt I would have been able to draw it far.


Might try a combo of maple and cherry laminations too would look pretty anyhow.


Thanks for the Pic of Mr. Hill would like to have met him. Do you know if it is his kids that are now running the company Howard Hill Archery?

Jeff:)

axhandle November 24th, 2010 07:23 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Wow, it must have been a heavy poundage.
A tip on "clamping"--stretch strips of cut inner tube around the work, cover the whole thing, the strips will contract and with tremendous effect.Tedious but it works.

I'll see if I can find my old notes on laminate bows, materials, glue--etc.
Hope to post a shematic of Cherokee bow for the Young one today.

I'm not sure about Mr.Hills kids running it now, they did years ago, and it was about 40 miles from me.

If you didn't see it--look at the statistics compiled on the archery site--- mind boggeling--to include flying birds.!

Ajla November 24th, 2010 08:32 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
I'm not really into welding, but it's getting cold, sitting on that bench, waiting!

axhandle November 24th, 2010 09:06 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ajla (Post 661636)
I'm not really into welding, but it's getting cold, sitting on that bench, waiting!

"Good Morning!, Netherlands!!":)
How are you , Ajla?-- I made Kolachi two days ago,Pecan Roll--and my thoughts were Ajla would like this--fresh yeast dough, minced pecans and a few crunchy ones in the mix, sweet, but not too sweet---some hot tea--a perfect mid morning on the bench waiting for the clouds to 'Open Up"--

I know Holland does not have "Thanksgiving,a Holiday) as here, but is there something similar there ?

axhandle November 24th, 2010 09:17 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ajla (Post 661636)
I'm not really into welding, but it's getting cold, sitting on that bench, waiting!

P.S. My present project is a Cart to ferry the household trash out to the road for pickup--about 30 yards, making it out of scrap bedrails,some Diamond Wire,good wheels,--and most of all dual purpose--haul mulch and etc around in it--

The "Blue Wrench,(oxacetylene torch), Glows", of late---Ax.

Ajla November 24th, 2010 09:23 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
1 Attachment(s)
We have different harvest festivals, but that's about all.
And now the atmosphere is full of Saint Nicholas!

axhandle November 24th, 2010 10:00 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ajla (Post 661685)
We have different harvest festivals, but that's about all.
And now the atmosphere is full of Saint Nicholas!

Santa, Santa Claus, St..Nicholas,(Morozko--Father Frost)-----St.Charles Bridge, "Im Praha"---;)

axhandle November 24th, 2010 10:07 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Yesterday(November , 2010), North Korea shot 200+ Artillary shells into South Korea, killed one South Korean Soldier--

moving further comments over to POF.

axhandle November 24th, 2010 04:06 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Holidays and Good Fortune to All---Ax.

axhandle November 24th, 2010 08:02 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
No Oyster dressing this year ,Missus came in from groceries--$10.00 per cup--

The house smells divine, dressing(plain) baking, most all of tomorrows fare is done--throw the turkey in the oven in A.M. and chow down at 1P.M.

Get out the Pepto and Tums, tomorrow night will be a Killer--:D

Happy Holidays to all--Ax.

Pepper November 24th, 2010 08:55 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
easy on the turkey and load up on the pies lol We do have a lot to be thankful dont we , happy Thanksgiving to you and yours > I work tommorrow but have vets to share the Holiday to be with , just like family too me .:)

redneckplanter November 24th, 2010 09:02 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
happy ho;idays sir loin...smiles

axhandle November 24th, 2010 09:42 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Pepper (Post 662206)
easy on the turkey and load up on the pies lol We do have a lot to be thankful dont we , happy Thanksgiving to you and yours > I work tommorrow but have vets to share the Holiday to be with , just like family too me .:)

We sure do Pep, and tomorrow one of the most thankful things we have--we'll be sitting on it ;):)--Give 'Tha Hooch and PWD a pat for me..--Ax.

axhandle November 24th, 2010 09:48 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by redneckplanter (Post 662219)
happy ho;idays sir loin...smiles

Chuckle, and I hope you are off for the Holiday and have a good one-- P.S. Found out for sure today, the Pig Bomb has been dropped here, and closer than I thought---I'm surrounded and about a 50 mile radius to boot--Some Pork Dressing would go good right about tomorrow.:)
Tell Little One hello for me, and you take care of yourself, as you already know Holidays are Cardinal times, PM me if you need anything----Friend--Ax.

redneckplanter November 24th, 2010 10:17 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
smiles yu gone invisible on us too ax?

axhandle November 25th, 2010 11:59 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by redneckplanter (Post 662272)
smiles yu gone invisible on us too ax?

Opaque maybe--:) but not invisible--:D

tweed November 25th, 2010 12:03 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Happy Thansgiving, Sir Ax. :)

Steve

axhandle November 25th, 2010 12:09 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by tweed (Post 662551)
Happy Thansgiving, Sir Ax. :)

Steve

"Top 'O 'Tha Mornin, Sir Tweed--have a very good one--to you and yours --Ax.

"The Bunch" will be piling in here any minute now--It's raining, and a Snooze this afternoon is in order--Ax.

axhandle November 26th, 2010 08:53 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
2 Attachment(s)
P.T.S.D.--Post Thansgiving Stress Disorder:

1."I can't believe I ate the whole thing"--
"Well you did , Ralph!" Alka Selzer commmercial--'70's
2. Yesterday Afternoon--chuckle--a few more later.

axhandle November 26th, 2010 12:03 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
1 Attachment(s)
Black Friday Shopping Riots--even Paul Mcartney was there--on the left.--chuckle--

axhandle November 26th, 2010 01:26 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
5 minutes Al.-- Auburn kick off--oh --boy the aftermath will go on for weeks--:)

Ajla November 27th, 2010 07:36 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 662917)
P.T.S.D.--Post Thansgiving Stress Disorder:

1."I can't believe I ate the whole thing"--
"Well you did , Ralph!" Alka Selzer commmercial--'70's
2. Yesterday Afternoon--chuckle--a few more later.

Is that Tomaz? Gorgeous!

Garlicluvr November 27th, 2010 08:55 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 661679)
P.S. My present project is a Cart to ferry the household trash out to the road for pickup--about 30 yards, making it out of scrap bedrails,some Diamond Wire,good wheels,--and most of all dual purpose--haul mulch and etc around in it--

The "Blue Wrench,(oxacetylene torch), Glows", of late---Ax.

Ax: I have heard the Oxyacetylene torch called a hot wrench but not a blue wrench. Do you do mostly gas welding? I have plenty of choices at the work shop, oxyacetylene, a little 120V portable stick welder, small engine driven portable welder, a nice ESAB multi-process machine Mig/DC Tig/Stick, and a Nice ESAB Tig welder with AC and high frequency start.

For Aluminum and small projects I mostly use the dedicated Tig machine with high frequency start as it gives the best quality weld and changing over from aluminum to stainless or carbon steel is fast just have to change tungsten pure tungsten for aluminum, thoriated for steel, that and a couple dial changes high frequency on for Aluminum start only for steel and AC for aluminum DC for steel. Have even welded lighter gauge copper with this machine up to 1/16" maybe 1/8" use bare copper electrical wire for the filler rod.

For projects with a lot of weld bead I use the MIG or wire feed as it is still very good quality weld with no slag chipping and the fastest method as you just pull the trigger and go no changing rods. Takes a 33lb spool and has pretty good duty cycle. Have the spoolgun for aluminum welding works well once you get the hang of it you just have to move very fast as it really sprays some metal out.

I dont use the stick welder unless there is no other choice, mostly for outdoor work where there is too much breeze to use a gas shielded welder like the Mig or tig it blows the shielding gas away. Or out in the field where I have no power and must use the engine driven welder.

I still like oxyacetylene it is very similar to tig just using flame instead of electric arc and versatile, its portable and you can weld, braze, solder, heat and cut I can get a fine weld on anything except aluminum. I have heard that it is possible to oxyweld aluminum but haven't had much luck with it.


Got back from the inlaws yesterday went up to their place in Western PA for thanksgiving did a little target shooting with the BIL, guy has an arsenal, shot the AK-47, a nice target .45, and a couple of big revolvers 41 mag and 44 mag. He has a tommy gun with the violin case real neat gun, didnt shoot it this time but that one is a lot of fun.

Sounds like you had a good thanksgiving, was good here too. I may get back to bow making in the next couple of days.


Jeff:)

chickweed November 27th, 2010 08:57 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Just watched a show on the cooking show about cooking the Ossabaw hog. The Fourcoursemen use all local foods.

axhandle November 29th, 2010 07:06 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
2 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ajla (Post 663366)
Is that Tomaz? Gorgeous!

I wish ,Ajla one of the prettiest cats I've encountered.
Tomaz wanders in and out sometimes gone for days--he drops by to eat and rest periodically.
Made these a day or so before Thanksgiving, pecan and walnut Kolachi--

1.Tomaz
2.Kolachi

axhandle November 29th, 2010 07:20 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Garlicluvr (Post 663381)
Ax: I have heard the Oxyacetylene torch called a hot wrench but not a blue wrench. Do you do mostly gas welding? I have plenty of choices at the work shop, oxyacetylene, a little 120V portable stick welder, small engine driven portable welder, a nice ESAB multi-process machine Mig/DC Tig/Stick, and a Nice ESAB Tig welder with AC and high frequency start.

For Aluminum and small projects I mostly use the dedicated Tig machine with high frequency start as it gives the best quality weld and changing over from aluminum to stainless or carbon steel is fast just have to change tungsten pure tungsten for aluminum, thoriated for steel, that and a couple dial changes high frequency on for Aluminum start only for steel and AC for aluminum DC for steel. Have even welded lighter gauge copper with this machine up to 1/16" maybe 1/8" use bare copper electrical wire for the filler rod.

For projects with a lot of weld bead I use the MIG or wire feed as it is still very good quality weld with no slag chipping and the fastest method as you just pull the trigger and go no changing rods. Takes a 33lb spool and has pretty good duty cycle. Have the spoolgun for aluminum welding works well once you get the hang of it you just have to move very fast as it really sprays some metal out.

I dont use the stick welder unless there is no other choice, mostly for outdoor work where there is too much breeze to use a gas shielded welder like the Mig or tig it blows the shielding gas away. Or out in the field where I have no power and must use the engine driven welder.

I still like oxyacetylene it is very similar to tig just using flame instead of electric arc and versatile, its portable and you can weld, braze, solder, heat and cut I can get a fine weld on anything except aluminum. I have heard that it is possible to oxyweld aluminum but haven't had much luck with it.


Got back from the inlaws yesterday went up to their place in Western PA for thanksgiving did a little target shooting with the BIL, guy has an arsenal, shot the AK-47, a nice target .45, and a couple of big revolvers 41 mag and 44 mag. He has a tommy gun with the violin case real neat gun, didnt shoot it this time but that one is a lot of fun.

Sounds like you had a good thanksgiving, was good here too. I may get back to bow making in the next couple of days.


Jeff:)

"Get the Blue Wrench out, it'll come off of there"

OA for cutting only, have a small MIG/Tig and an old stick welder.
I really like the Mig--
SIL is a machinist and can do just about anything, he's more familiar than I with same, they have to (attempt) to repair some of the electric motors from China (1000 Hp and up)--he says it's almost impossible to get a weld to stick--metallurgy is junk coming from there.
They chopper them out to Navy vessals to do onboard repairs periodically.

Venerable AK--yes I've shot a few;):)--have a .45 but the smoothest I shot was Doc friends Colt Gold Cup--a far cry from Mil issue (pre-Beretta).

Sounds like your friend has a Chicago Piano--the tommy,--friend of mine had a PPSh--darn thing sounded like a hornets nest ripping a pair of blue jeans apart when he touched it off--typical Bloc design--tough, reliable, high rate of fire and cheap to make--it's wicked.

Glad you had a bit of a Walkabout at T'giving does one good--Ax.

axhandle November 29th, 2010 07:26 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by chickweed (Post 663385)
Just watched a show on the cooking show about cooking the Ossabaw hog. The Fourcoursemen use all local foods.

Well, Chick don't have to plan a hog hunt, SIL brother got chased back in to the house by a boar a couple weeks ago.
He has a mulch/ kitchen refuse pile out back at the treeline and the Boar didn't like him poking around in his food supply.
Rule of thumb for every one you see, count on at least 10 back in the "Bush"

'Bout Hog 'Killin weather--

Ajla November 29th, 2010 08:33 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 664152)
I wish ,Ajla one of the prettiest cats I've encountered.
Tomaz wanders in and out sometimes gone for days--he drops by to eat and rest periodically.
Made these a day or so before Thanksgiving, pecan and walnut Kolachi--

1.Tomaz
2.Kolachi

I'm glad I don't have to choose between the two pics, they both look so good!
While here it is seriously starting to look like winter! Rosy cheeks and all! ;)

axhandle November 29th, 2010 09:13 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ajla (Post 664201)
I'm glad I don't have to choose between the two pics, they both look so good!
While here it is seriously starting to look like winter! Rosy cheeks and all! ;)

My neighbors cat looks just like it , only about 5 lbs heavier--it visits us.

I envy you Ajla, it never freezes the ponds or rivers here--never enough to support weight.
I would dearly love to be able to take one of those Ice Sailboats out--a Thermos of Glogg, cheese and bread--silk scarf blowing in the wake---"Hang on Today We cross the Zeider Zee";):D----what an Outing!!!

Stay warm, almost time to burn some Myrrh--;)

Garlicluvr November 29th, 2010 09:15 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 664156)
"Get the Blue Wrench out, it'll come off of there"

OA for cutting only, have a small MIG/Tig and an old stick welder.
I really like the Mig--
SIL is a machinist and can do just about anything, he's more familiar than I with same, they have to (attempt) to repair some of the electric motors from China (1000 Hp and up)--he says it's almost impossible to get a weld to stick--metallurgy is junk coming from there.
They chopper them out to Navy vessals to do onboard repairs periodically.

Venerable AK--yes I've shot a few;):)--have a .45 but the smoothest I shot was Doc friends Colt Gold Cup--a far cry from Mil issue (pre-Beretta).

Sounds like your friend has a Chicago Piano--the tommy,--friend of mine had a PPSh--darn thing sounded like a hornets nest ripping a pair of blue jeans apart when he touched it off--typical Bloc design--tough, reliable, high rate of fire and cheap to make--it's wicked.

Glad you had a bit of a Walkabout at T'giving does one good--Ax.

Ax: The .45 was sweet BIL has his own machine shop and does some custom ones all based on Model 911 but tweaked and peaked for max smoothness and accuracy. 45's are his favorite so he has quite a few probable a half dozen or more at any given time. The one we shot was his goto target competition gun and very accurate. We were shooting metallic turkey silouhettes at 50 yards and using a post to steady myself a bit I was able to pick off four with five shots and I havent shot a handgun in years.

Finally lit off the woodstove had a couple of fires over the weekend. Love the smell of woodsmoke especially cherry.

This morning had a hard frost with thick fog. The chill in the air and the smell of leaves and earth were very pleasant.

Jeff:)

axhandle November 29th, 2010 10:36 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
I still have a .45--;)

When the Low Fog sets in here, everyone wants to know when I will burn Christmas Cherry, along with some aromatic Pine--

Garlicluvr November 29th, 2010 11:31 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 664257)
I still have a .45--;)

When the Low Fog sets in here, everyone wants to know when I will burn Christmas Cherry, along with some aromatic Pine--

The pine does smell nice too. I have tons of eastern red cedar on the place so always have some cut up branches for starting fires, cedar smell is heavenly.


Jeff:)

axhandle November 29th, 2010 11:40 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
"As I lit my candle to climb the damp, stone stairs to the North Tower, an answer to my dear Friends letter of , last, and on my mind: my Hearth Mouse came out"

"And what is the Fare of the Eve?--, my Friends have brought in Chestnuts, wood for the fire, and cheese and bread, !"

"I wish you the Eve, my Friend, but do not throw ones self about too much, and save some wood for the Morning Lark"

axhandle November 29th, 2010 11:42 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Garlicluvr (Post 664283)
The pine does smell nice too. I have tons of eastern red cedar on the place so always have some cut up branches for starting fires, cedar smell is heavenly.


Jeff:)

You got red cedar, and worried about bows, and comfort--;)

Garlicluvr November 29th, 2010 11:54 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 664291)
You got red cedar, and worried about bows, and comfort--;)

Ax: Was wondering about cedar bows. Red cedar is easy to work and somewhat flexible but also a bit brittle. Have you ever tried it on bows?

One whole side of my property is lined with red cedar, plus some in the woods. I harvested a half dozen this spring for fence posts.


Jeff:)

axhandle November 29th, 2010 12:02 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Garlicluvr (Post 664303)
Ax: Was wondering about cedar bows. Red cedar is easy to work and somewhat flexible but also a bit brittle. Have you ever tried it on bows?

One whole side of my property is lined with red cedar, plus some in the woods. I harvested a half dozen this spring for fence posts.


Jeff:)

Extremely good for keeping bugs 'Abay, vermin and Light 'fer 'Tha Carry--aromatic and floats when all else fails--

Ajla November 30th, 2010 08:58 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 664223)
My neighbors cat looks just like it , only about 5 lbs heavier--it visits us.

I envy you Ajla, it never freezes the ponds or rivers here--never enough to support weight.
I would dearly love to be able to take one of those Ice Sailboats out--a Thermos of Glogg, cheese and bread--silk scarf blowing in the wake---"Hang on Today We cross the Zeider Zee";):D----what an Outing!!!

Stay warm, almost time to burn some Myrrh--;)

The last time the river froze was in the sixties, and for the last 18 years it wasn't cold enough to skate on the lakes, so a whole generation missed out on the fun!
But, who knows, it's cold early this year! :) Global warming?

axhandle November 30th, 2010 10:39 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ajla (Post 664892)
The last time the river froze was in the sixties, and for the last 18 years it wasn't cold enough to skate on the lakes, so a whole generation missed out on the fun!
But, who knows, it's cold early this year! :) Global warming?

Ajla, I remember in that time, early'60's very unusual here,--I have some buried pics, of me on a Pond,--and I agree--the generation missed out on so many memories--the Honed Skates- good for miles , and a happy return-much fun and reverlry-wholsome-"To get back to Baba's Frische's Brot, maybe some good vegetable soup, and good butter, and warmth of a well maintained and cordial kitchen--Oh Well, I am Drifting Off--;):)

axhandle November 30th, 2010 11:08 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
3 Attachment(s)
Missus and I found this, the weekend, 1890's,and what better a piece to write Memoirs on, do some Pen and Inks--I'm good--My Pelikans,pen tips, and E'Special Paper finally came to me--Und , "Wo Binst, Ax"---chuckle always the man behind the Camera--

axhandle November 30th, 2010 12:27 PM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Instead of turning one's self inward,think about all the Troops, in a "Land ,Far Far Away"--well, get off your butts-- Now!!--do something--and I hope the Guys and Gals, in the Field see this--Ax.

Garlicluvr December 1st, 2010 07:02 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 664984)
Missus and I found this, the weekend, 1890's,and what better a piece to write Memoirs on, do some Pen and Inks--I'm good--My Pelikans,pen tips, and E'Special Paper finally came to me--Und , "Wo Binst, Ax"---chuckle always the man behind the Camera--

Nice find Ax: I like the figure on the fold out desk.

Jeff:)

skiracer December 1st, 2010 07:05 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 664984)
Missus and I found this, the weekend, 1890's,and what better a piece to write Memoirs on, do some Pen and Inks--I'm good--My Pelikans,pen tips, and E'Special Paper finally came to me--Und , "Wo Binst, Ax"---chuckle always the man behind the Camera--

Texas High Boy and looks like a decent one. nice pickup ax.

axhandle December 1st, 2010 08:30 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Garlicluvr (Post 665419)
Nice find Ax: I like the figure on the fold out desk.

Jeff:)

Got to do some repro work on the decoration, some of it is missing--the locks are all mortised in.

While on my mind, re: bow laminates I used Elmers 2 part waterproof glue when I built a saiboat.
It looks and smells like grape juice, but will skunk you out in a confined space--:)very good stuff.

Glad you got to do some 'Shootin over the holidays, I'm long overdue and miss it.

axhandle December 1st, 2010 08:35 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by skiracer (Post 665420)
Texas High Boy and looks like a decent one. nice pickup ax.

Indebted to you ,Ski I had no idea except a secretary--no cartouches or marks except penciled number 13 on some inside pieces--very good shape--a user--

Thanks--

axhandle December 1st, 2010 08:40 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Garlicluvr (Post 665419)
Nice find Ax: I like the figure on the fold out desk.

Jeff:)

Jeff, I have made due note of your welding tips back on another post, in my infancy on Mig and Tig-- and your post--most helpful--Ax.

axhandle December 1st, 2010 11:11 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Off to Doc here in a bit, 60 mile round trip via interstate--got to blow the soot out of my rig.---It's like Talladega out there--on amphetamines.

Garlicluvr December 1st, 2010 11:33 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 665466)
Got to do some repro work on the decoration, some of it is missing--the locks are all mortised in.

While on my mind, re: bow laminates I used Elmers 2 part waterproof glue when I built a saiboat.
It looks and smells like grape juice, but will skunk you out in a confined space--:)very good stuff.

Glad you got to do some 'Shootin over the holidays, I'm long overdue and miss it.

Ax: I will try to find the elemers 2-part waterproof glue. I used Titebond 2 waterproof wood glue the same stuff I use on most all of my woodworking glue-ups. I know it bonds well to wood just dont know how it will hold up to repeated flexing, shock and vibration.


Jeff:)

Garlicluvr December 1st, 2010 11:50 AM

Re: AX'S CORNER
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by axhandle (Post 665479)
Jeff, I have made due note of your welding tips back on another post, in my infancy on Mig and Tig-- and your post--most helpful--Ax.

You are welcome Ax I really like Tig as it gives the best quality weld and you have very precise control over heat input, with the same rig you can weld stuff as thin as a beer can or as thick as 1/2" or more just by changing tungsten size and foot pedal control of the welding current. I find I can even go back and reflow weld that is a little rough or didnt flow properly. It is also good for filling holes, use the foot pedal like an car accelerator, set max current with your dial then pedal lets you go from zero to max.

As I said before for big projects where you have to put down lots of weld bead you cant beat a Mig gun. Also if you do have to work outside where wind is an issue flux core wire for a mig works good. In fact they are starting to use it more and more in skyscraper construction as it is much more efficient, saves time and material.


Have a good Doc visit and make it back safe. You got a roll cage and racing harness in that rig of yours?:D

Jeff:)


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